The Camel Inheritance

Sheik Abdullah ben Suleiman al Rashid was assassinated, leaving a will that only included his three sons. The will stipulated that his 35 camels be divided into 2, 3 and 9 parts among them.

The Sheik’s sons Mohammed, Barkatullah and Fawaz waxed hysterical in trying to work out what to do to comply with their father’s will.

“How can we divide a camel into two or three or even nine parts?” said Mohammed pulling anxiously on his beard.

“It is definitely not possible,” responded Barkatullah, puffing heavily on his hookah, eyes rolling.

“Perhaps we should consult the butcher so we can all get a fair share according to our father’s will,” suggested Fawaz, sipping his black coffee while Fatima adjusted his caftan.

They discussed the matter loudly for hours until their neighbor Mahmoud al Mansur got fed up with the noise disturbing his prayers. Mahmoud went to see them and suggested that the problem could easily be solved, explaining what needed to be done.

As the solution was so simple, Mohammed, Barkatullah and Fawaz quickly agreed and the division of the camels went smoothly.

“With an inheritance of 53 camels, I would have had a profit of two camels in the deal instead of one,” lamented Mahmoud al Mansur, leading the two camels to his stables.

How did Mahmoud al Mansur solve the problem of dividing Sheik Abdullah ben Suleiman al Rashid’s camels among Mohammed, Barkatullah and Fawaz, and why would he have gained two camels if there had been 53 camels in the will?

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