The Fibonacci Demo

“You lose again, Lenny“ sneered Snipe after his loaded dice turned up another seven on the green felt table mat.

“Now you owe me a hundred dollars. Hand it over now,” demanded Snipe, hand extended.

“Well. . . seems you have had an extraordinary streak of luck, Snipe,” replied Lenny, raising an eyebrow while handing over a Franklin note.

“To show I’m not a bad loser, how about a bet for two hundred bucks this time?” suggested Lenny.

“What kind of a bet,” said Snipe suspiciously, eyes narrowing while he pocketed the Franklin note.

“Well, it goes like this, Snipe. You think of two numbers. Then I ask you to manipulate the numbers some times, after which I tell you the result,” explained Lenny.

“You mean, I don’t tell you what the numbers I think of and manipulate are? said an incredulous Snipe.

“That’s right,” said Lenny with a mischievous smile.

“You’re on, and you’ll lose again,” laughed Snipe.

Lenny pulled out a pocket calculator, a yellow notepad and a pen from his backpack and placed them on the table in front of a surprised Snipe.

“Here you go, Snipe. You just think of two numbers and get ready to write down all the results, so we can check them later, if necessary,” explained Lenny.

“I’ve already got two numbers in mind,” said Snipe, eyeing some cars passing by.

“Then add them together,” instructed Lenny.

“No problem, “ replied Snipe, noting the sum with his pad well hidden from view.

“Now add one of the two numbers you first thought of to the sum you just got,” continued Lenny.

“Done, no sweat.” Snipe was already anticipating the two hundred dollars he would soon win.

“To the new sum, add the last sum.”

“Ok.”

“To the new sum, add the last sum,” said Lenny.

“Ok, how long will this continue,” complained Snipe with a bored expression on his face.

“To the new sum, add the last sum,” said Lenny.

“You sound like a parrot.”

“To the new sum, add the last sum,” said Lenny.

“Come on. I don’t have all day.” Snipe was getting irritated.

“To the new sum, add the last sum,” said Lenny.

“Ok, the last time or the bet’s off,” threatened Snipe.

“Now divide the last sum you have by the previous sum,” said Lenny.

“Good enough,” said Snipe.

“Multiply the result by ten and strike out the fractional part,” said Lenny.

“Ok, and now what?”

“Now I’ll tell you what the number you have left is, and if I am right, you lose the bet,” said Lenny.

“No way you can know it. Go ahead, tell me the wrong number.”

“The number you have left is sixteen. Show me your notepad results,” demanded Lenny.

A surprised Snipe handed over the notepad.

“Rats, I don’t believe it!! Tell me how it works.” said Snipe mouth agape.

“Pay up the two hundred dollars and I’ll give you some advice,” said Lenny.

Snipe handed over the two hundred dollars. “So what’s your advice,” said Snipe eagerly awaiting the advice.

“I won’t tell you how it works, because you’ll use it to make money from people ignorant of mathematics. My advice is to get some education and learn a useful profession,” said Lenny.

Snipe threw down the pen and stomped off in disgust.

Can you work out how Lenny knew the final result?

About Ken

Bachelor of Science in Physics, Honors, University of Maryland. Graduate of Danish School of Classical Homeopathy in 1998. Studies over several years at the International Academy of Classical Homeopathy in Alonnisos, Greece with the world-famous homeopath George Vithoulkas (winner of the Right Livelihood Award, the alternative Nobel Prize). Director of Klinik for Klassisk Homøopati in Herlev, Denmark. Director of the Iberian School and Clinic of Classical Homeopathy in Estepona, Costa del Sol, Spain and Gibraltar. Founding member of the Spanish Association of Classical Homeopathy (Asociación Española de Homeopatía Unicista) approved by ECCH (European Council for Classical Homeopathy). Currently director of the International Homeopathic Web Clinic and the Avila Clinic and School of Classical Homeopathy in Caracas, Venezuela. Kjetill Oftedal offers consultations in English, Spanish, Norwegian, Danish, Swedish, German, Dutch and Portuguese.
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