The Winning Seats

The McDuffy Travel Agency was offering special prizes for vacationers to improve its turnover. The advertising stated that the prizes would be determined on the airport bus.

One day there were fifteen vacationers going to the Caribbean island of Buena Siesta for a two week holiday at the Balmy Breezes Beach Resort. Before boarding the airport bus, which seated twenty persons, they were addressed by their charming tour guide Melanie Goodbottom.

“Two of you could win some awesome prizes if you are lucky enough to sit in the two seats with pre-determined prize seat numbers,” explained Melanie Goodbottom waving a clipboard with the passenger list at the entrance to the airport bus, skirt flapping in the wind.

“The winners will receive a week of free dinners for two at any of the best restaurants in Morgan Town, their choice of sightseeing tours for two all over the island and/or scuba diving lessons for two – for those of you who are of the sporty type, of course,” said Melanie Goodbottom enthusiastically, brushing some windblown locks out of her eyes.

The vacationers eagerly thronged towards the airport bus door, climbing over each other to mount the steps of the bus. Those who entered scurried to seat themselves at random, leaving five seats unoccupied for staff.

The bus driver grunted, sitting down at the wheel, and the porter got busy loading luggage into the lower compartments of the airport bus, while Melanie Goodbottom helped pull a number of the more portly passengers up the steps leading to the seating level of the bus.

When all the passengers were finally settled into their lush seats eagerly anticipating the results, Melanie Goodbottom picked up a microphone to announce any winners via the loudspeaker system, and the bus driver switched gears to get the show rolling towards the airport.

What would you say is the probability of two passengers winning these prizes?

 

About Ken

Bachelor of Science in Physics, Honors, University of Maryland. Graduate of Danish School of Classical Homeopathy in 1998. Studies over several years at the International Academy of Classical Homeopathy in Alonnisos, Greece with the world-famous homeopath George Vithoulkas (winner of the Right Livelihood Award, the alternative Nobel Prize). Director of Klinik for Klassisk Homøopati in Herlev, Denmark. Director of the Iberian School and Clinic of Classical Homeopathy in Estepona, Costa del Sol, Spain and Gibraltar. Founding member of the Spanish Association of Classical Homeopathy (Asociación Española de Homeopatía Unicista) approved by ECCH (European Council for Classical Homeopathy). Currently director of the International Homeopathic Web Clinic and the Avila Clinic and School of Classical Homeopathy in Caracas, Venezuela. Kjetill Oftedal offers consultations in English, Spanish, Norwegian, Danish, Swedish, German, Dutch and Portuguese.
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