The Three Cards

There was excitement again at the Happy Valley Card Club one Saturday afternoon. People were gathered around a table where a dealer was dealing three cards from a deck face down on the table, then, a bit later, three cards face up.

Jake was curious and approached the dealer.

“How’s this game work, Charlie?” asked Jake.

“Well, you bet five dollars, then I shuffle and lay three cards face down on the table, after which you guess what the suits of the cards are,” said Charlie.

“You mean like two clubs and a heart, or three spades, or two diamonds and a club, and so on?” asked Jake.

“That’s right, Jake. If you guess the suits correctly, then you win ten dollars,” said Charlie.

“If your guess is wrong, then I’ll shuffle and lay down three cards face up. If there are no aces among the three cards, then you get another chance to guess the next three cards I deal face down for free,” said Charlie.

“Hmm, sounds interesting. Let’s give it a go,” said Jake.

After 10 rounds of arriving at a win or ace face up in this game, how much money would you say Jake won or lost?

About Ken

Bachelor of Science in Physics, Honors, University of Maryland. Graduate of Danish School of Classical Homeopathy in 1998. Studies over several years at the International Academy of Classical Homeopathy in Alonnisos, Greece with the world-famous homeopath George Vithoulkas (winner of the Right Livelihood Award, the alternative Nobel Prize). Director of Klinik for Klassisk Homøopati in Herlev, Denmark. Director of the Iberian School and Clinic of Classical Homeopathy in Estepona, Costa del Sol, Spain and Gibraltar. Founding member of the Spanish Association of Classical Homeopathy (Asociación Española de Homeopatía Unicista) approved by ECCH (European Council for Classical Homeopathy). Currently director of the International Homeopathic Web Clinic and the Avila Clinic and School of Classical Homeopathy in Caracas, Venezuela. Kjetill Oftedal offers consultations in English, Spanish, Norwegian, Danish, Swedish, German, Dutch and Portuguese.
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