Posts Tagged ‘lederhosen’

The Special Coins

Friday, June 16th, 2017

During a cold and crisp January afternoon with azure blue skies setting off peaked snow-capped mountains, Jack and Jill were enjoying a skiing holiday at a resort in the Bavarian Alps. They were busy checking out Dr. Feynstein’s souvenir shop.

“Jack, I want to buy you that cute lederhosen leather breeches outfit the strapping male model in that glass exhibition booth is wearing,” said Jill enthusiastically, pulling on his arm and pointing.

“I really like the colorful feather in his hat, and you’ll look great in that outfit,” said Jill clapping her hands with joy.

“I would prefer the five liter beer mug displayed in that other case over there, the one with a colored image of a castle,” said Jack sedately, scratching his Van Dyke beard.

“Sure, we can get that too, but the lederhosen outfit will really impress my uncle Fritz, who was raised in Bavaria,” said Jill.

“Jill, I think uncle Fritz will probably be more impressed with the beer mug,” said Jack laughing.

“Ok Jack, you win, you buy the lederhosen outfit, and I’ll buy the beer mug,” said Jill quickly.

“Deal?”

Jack mumbled something. “Well ok, Jill, but I’ll only wear it at uncle Fritz’ parties.”

“Fine, Jack, but you’ll change your mind when we go to the German bar with the Oompah band,” said Jill.

Jill, who spoke German, asked the salesman, a beer-bellied fellow named Herr Berger, how much the lederhosen and the beer mug cost.

Herr Berger explained that all items displayed in a glass case were created by the eccentric designer Dr. Gustav Feynstein.

To obtain such goods customers would have to purchase the special coins Dr. Feynstein had made for use in constructing a mini model of a Bavarian town he planned to become mayor of.

Dr Feynstein believed his election victory would be ensured  by the rational thought power imbued into the special coins by intelligent purchasers of his goods.

Herr Berger explained further that the correct combination of coins dumped into the funnel by the glass exhibition booths would open the respective door so the desired goods could be removed.

Herr Berger stated that the coins had holes of three types:  round, triangular and square in the center.

In conclusion, Herr Berger informed that the respective prices of the round, triangular and square coins were 190/29, 280/29 and 340/29 euros. All credit cards accepted for payment, of course.

Jill took some notes and then explained the procedure to Jack, who was dumbfounded shaking his head – but agreed anyway.

“You mean that the price of the beer mug is 160 euros and the lederhosen outfit costs 1600. What a ripoff, Jill,” groaned Jack.

“And we have to figure out how many coins are needed to pay for this stuff – incredible.”

“Yes, but think of how great conversation pieces they will be back home,” replied Jill.

Jack worked out the number of coins needed on his notebook and paid for both the lederhosen and the beer mug. Jill, with a big smile, dumped all the coins clanking away into the funnel.

“Jill, I’m thirsty. Let’s go to the nearest Hofbräuhaus to test the goods,” said Jack eagerly. Jill followed holding bags with the lederhosen and the beer mug.

How many coins in total did Jack and Jill need to purchase these items?